Although a lumberjack has become a common cultural icon, a symbol of masculinity and strength, few people are familiar with the “lumber jill,” or her history. During World War II, while few men were available for manual labor, a British unit called ” The Women’s Land Army,” had a division of lumberjills. These heroic women were drafted at the beginning of the War to ensure there was enough lumber available for British industry. Home-produced timber was crucial for aircraft and railway construction, ship-building, charcoal for explosives and gas mask filters, not to mention everyday uses such as packaging and coffins. Some were actually stationed in forest huts, others stayed with locals. Although these women faced prejudice from lumberjacks and locals, they continued with the work that many considered un-ladylike. Thanks Ron, I had a lot of fun doing this tattoo and learned a lot about lumberjills!